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Have You Been Charged With a Crime?

If you've been arrested or charged with a crime, you need the immediate assistance of a criminal defence lawyer.  Being charged with a crime - whether major or minor - is a serious matter. A person facing criminal charges risks severe penalties and consequences, such as jail time, having a criminal record, and loss of relationships and future job prospects, among other things. While some legal matters can be handled alone, a criminal arrest of any nature warrants the legal advice of a qualified criminal defence attorney who can protect your rights and secure the best possible outcome for your case. 

We're Here to Assist You Around the Clock

It’s natural to feel fear and concern when being investigated for, or charged with a criminal defence. Don’t leave the outcome of a serious situation to chance. We’re available to assist, advise and fight for you 24 hours a day. We’ll help you navigate the Criminal Justice System and ensure your rights are represented. 

Areas of Experience

At Mercier Law we understand that being charged with a criminal offense can carry serious consequences and leave you with a criminal record. If found guilty, you may also face time in jail. We have successfully helped clients facing a range of criminal charges. Listed below are some of the most common, however, we are prepared and able to assist you with any situation you are facing.   


We have the knowledge and experience to do what it takes to launch a compelling defence for our clients.

Assault

The definition of Assault is set out in s. 265 (1) of the Criminal Code of Canada as follows:

  • 265. (1) A person commits an assault when 
  • (a) without the consent of another person, he applies force intentionally to that other person, directly or indirectly;
  • (b) he attempts or threatens, by an act or a gesture, to apply force to another person, if he has, or causes that other person to believe on reasonable grounds that he has, present ability to effect his purpose; or
  • (c) while openly wearing or carrying a weapon or an imitation thereof, he accosts or impedes another person or begs.

Aggravated Assault

The definition of aggravated assault is set out in s. 268 (1) and the punishment is set out in s. 268 (2) of the Criminal Code of Canada as follows:

  • 268. (1) Every one commits an aggravated assault who wounds, maims, disfigures or endangers the life of the complainant.
  • (2) Every one who commits an aggravated assault is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years.

Domestic Assault

Domestic Assault charges stem from a variety of domestic relationships such as: Boyfriend/Girlfriend, Husband/Wife, Common Law Partners and Same Sex Partners.


While the relationship of the perpetrator and the victim has to confine to the definition of being “domestic”, the definition of assault remains the same under s. 265 (1) of the Criminal Code of Canada:

  • 265. (1) A person commits an assault when 
  • (a) without the consent of another person, he applies force intentionally to that other person, directly or indirectly;
  • (b) he attempts or threatens, by an act or a gesture, to apply force to another person, if he has, or causes that other person to believe on reasonable grounds that he has, present ability to effect his purpose; or
  • (c) while openly wearing or carrying a weapon or an imitation thereof, he accosts or impedes another person or begs.

Drug Offences

Drug Offences fall under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act which states in s. 7(1):

  • 7.1 (1) No person shall possess, produce, sell, import or transport anything intending that it will be used
  • (a) to produce a controlled substance, unless the production of the controlled substance is lawfully authorized; or
  • (b) to traffic in a controlled substance.


Impaired Driving

The definition of Impaired Driving  is set out in s. 253 (1) of the Criminal Code of Canada as follows:

  • 253 (1) Every one commits an offence who operates a motor vehicle or vessel or operates or assists in the operation of an aircraft or of railway equipment or has the care or control of a motor vehicle, vessel, aircraft or railway equipment, whether it is in motion or not,
  • (a) while the person’s ability to operate the vehicle, vessel, aircraft or railway equipment is impaired by alcohol or a drug; or
  • (b) having consumed alcohol in such a quantity that the concentration in the person’s blood exceeds eighty milligrams of alcohol in one hundred millilitres of blood.

Fraud

The definition of Fraud is set out in s. 380 (1) of the Criminal Code of Canada as follows:

  • 380. (1) Every one who, by deceit, falsehood or other fraudulent means, whether or not it is a false pretence within the meaning of this Act, defrauds the public or any person, whether ascertained or not, of any property, money or valuable security or any service,
  • (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to a term of imprisonment not exceeding fourteen years, where the subject-matter of the offence is a testamentary instrument or the value of the subject-matter of the offence exceeds five thousand dollars; or
  • (b) is guilty
  • (i) of an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or
  • (ii) of an offence punishable on summary conviction,
  • where the value of the subject-matter of the offence does not exceed five thousand dollars.

Theft

The definition of Theft  is set out in s. 322.1of the Criminal Code of Canada as follows: 

  • 322 (1) Every one commits theft who fraudulently and without colour of right takes, or fraudulently and without colour of right converts to his use or to the use of another person, anything, whether animate or inanimate, with intent
  • (a) to deprive, temporarily or absolutely, the owner of it, or a person who has a special property or interest in it, of the thing or of his property or interest in it;
  • (b) to pledge it or deposit it as security;
  • (c) to part with it under a condition with respect to its return that the person who parts with it may be unable to perform; or
  • (d) to deal with it in such a manner that it cannot be restored in the condition in which it was at the time it was taken or converted.

Threats

The definition of Uttering Threat is set out in s. 264.1of the Criminal Code of Canada as follows:

  • 264.1 (1) Every one commits an offence who, in any manner, knowingly utters, conveys or causes any person to receive a threat
  • (a) to cause death or bodily harm to any person;
  • (b) to burn, destroy or damage real or personal property; or
  • (c) to kill, poison or injure an animal or bird that is the property of any person.